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By Virgin Islands Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists
May 07, 2020
Category: Cardiology
Tags: Heart Disease  

It’s never too late to invest in your heart health.

Heart disease is the number one killer of American men and women; however, it’s comforting to know that just by improving your lifestyle, you can drastically improve the health of your heart. From our offices in St. Thomas and St. Croix, Dr. Jeffrey Chase, and cardiologist, Dr. Ahmet Sayan, can help reduce your risk for heart disease and stroke.

Get Active

If you don’t already get regular aerobic exercise each week, then it’s time to start incorporating physical fitness into your lifestyle. This translates to about 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity or 75 minutes of intense exercise. If you already work out regularly, try upping the intensity of your current routine to gain even more benefits. If you are just starting your fitness journey, your cardiologist can discuss ways to begin working out safely.

Choose a Healthy, Balanced Diet

What you eat has a profound impact on your health. Your diet should consist of mainly whole grains, vegetables, lean proteins, legumes, nuts, and plant-based proteins, as well as lean animal protein such as chicken or fish. Avoid refined sugar and starches such as cakes, cookies, white bread, and pasta. Always check the nutrition labels and avoid most packaged foods, as they are chock full of sodium, sugar, and other preservatives.

Maintain a Healthy Weight

It’s also incredibly important to maintain a healthy body mass index (BMI). If you are overweight, it’s important to consult with your cardiologist to determine the best strategies to help you lose weight safely. Eating healthy and regularly exercising are two of the biggest habits you can adopt to help lose excess weight and maintain your ideal BMI.

Quit Smoking

If you use tobacco products or you smoke, it’s time to ditch the habit. Smoking causes a lot of serious health problems including an elevated heart rate, high blood pressure, and an irregular heartbeat. If you are having trouble quitting, your cardiologist can help you find successful ways to ditch the habit for good. It’s also important to avoid secondhand smoke, which can also have detrimental effects on your health.

Virgin Islands Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists deeply cares about the health of its patients, especially during the pandemic. This is why we are offering telemedicine appointments for patients dealing with minor issues or currently undergoing physical therapy; however, our medical team is still caring for patients dealing with cardiac and musculoskeletal problems. For walk-in emergency care, please give us a call first at our St. Thomas office at (340) 714-2845 or our St. Croix office at (340) 692-5000.

By Virgin Island Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists
April 22, 2020
Category: Health Care

How your doctors in Saint Croix and Saint Thomas can help you stay healthy

If you have heart disease, you already know how dramatically it can affect your life. Problems with your heart can keep you from enjoying the activities of your life. Fortunately, you can do a lot to prevent heart disease and keep your heart healthy. Furthermore, with two convenient office locations in Saint Croix and Saint Thomas, Dr. Ahmet Sayan of Virgin Islands Orthopaedics & Medical Specialists can help.

You may not know that you have heart issues, because they often sneak up on patients. In fact, high blood pressure has been called the “silent killer” because there are few or no symptoms associated with it. This is why regular physicals and examinations by your doctor are so important. By performing examinations and recommending lab testing, high blood pressure and high cholesterol can be identified early, before they can do damage to your heart.

Regular medical care is an important part of living a heart-healthy lifestyle, and the other important part is what you do when you are not at the doctor. To live a heart-healthy lifestyle, you must:

  • Exercise regularly for at least 30 minutes most days of the week. Your exercise routine needs to including aerobic exercises like jogging or swimming to get your heart pumping.
  • Manage stress by using relaxation techniques including meditation and yoga
  • Eat a heart-healthy diet including lean meats, vegetables, fruits, and non-fat or low-fat dairy products.
  • Avoid fried, fatty foods and limit your salt intake.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. It helps to eat foods high in fiber so that you feel full for longer. Also, make sure that what you eat is high in the nutrients that your body needs,
  • Keep a healthy smile by regularly brushing and flossing. When your mouth is healthy, it lowers your risk of some serious diseases, including endocarditis and heart disease.

To learn more about maintaining heart health, talk with an expert: call  Dr. Ahmet Sayan of Virgin Islands Orthopaedics & Medical Specialists. You can reach him in Saint Croix at (340) 692-5000, or at his office in Saint Thomas at (340) 714-2845. Call today!

By Virgin Island Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists
March 26, 2020
Category: Cardiology

Cardiovascular disease is an umbrella term used for describing conditions that negatively impact the circulatory system and the heart, including heart attack, stroke, and heart disease.

During an appointment here at Virgin Island Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists, your physicians, Dr. Jeffrey Chase and Dr. Ahmet Sayan, can assess your risk for cardiovascular disease in either our St. Thomas or St. Croix locations, and make suggestions on how you can reduce it.

What are Non-Modifiable and Modifiable Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease?

Risk factors for cardiovascular disease could be divided into two categories: modifiable and non-modifiable. Modifiable risk factors are basically those that you can control or minimize with certain lifestyle adjustments, while non-modifiable risk factors are those that you can’t change.

While having one or several risk factors could increase your risk of developing cardiovascular disease, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you will develop cardiovascular disease. There is, however, a higher chance that you might. This is why getting an accurate assessment of your risk for the disease is extremely vital.

Modifiable Risks Factors for Cardiovascular Disease

  • Smoking
  • An unhealthy diet
  • Physical inactivity
  • Unregulated cholesterol levels: low HDL or elevated LDL

Non-Modifiable Risks Factors for Cardiovascular Disease

  • Age
  • A history of cardiovascular disease in the family
  • Ethnicity
  • Sex

Reducing Your Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease

To try and minimize your risk of developing cardiovascular disease, you should eat a healthy diet with lots of veggies, fruits, whole grains, and healthy oils. You should likewise exercise at least five days per week, limit your intake of alcoholic drinks, and stop smoking right now. It’s also crucial to note that stress could significantly influence plenty of cardiovascular disease risk factors, which include excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, poor eating habits, lack of exercise, and high blood pressure.

Furthermore, a poor work-to-personal-life balance can lead to stress and contributes to an individual’s risk of cardiovascular disease. This means that you should prioritize stress management and find effective ways to de-stress. Additionally, maintaining a healthy weight and managing health problems like diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol, with help from your doctor, is immensely vital.

Know Your Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease Now

Schedule an assessment with one of our doctors, Dr. Jeffrey Chase or Dr. Ahmet Sayan here at the Virgin Island Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists. Call (340) 714-2845 for our St. Thomas office, or (340) 692-5000 for our St. Croix office.

By Virgin Island Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists
March 24, 2020
Category: Orthopedics
Tags: EKG  

An EKG, also known as an ECG or electrocardiogram, records the heart’s electrical signals. It’s a very common test for detecting heart issues and monitoring the overall condition of the heart. They are usually performed in the doctor’s office, a hospital room, or clinic. They are likewise standard equipment in ambulances and operating rooms. Here at Virgin Island Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists in St. Thomas and St. Croix, Dr. Jeffrey Chase and Dr. Ahmet Sayan utilize an EKG to check what’s going on with your heart.

What to Expect During an EKG?

An EKG is a simple, painless, and non-invasive test that yields fast results. You might need to wear a hospital gown and would have to lie down on a bed or examination table. Electrodes will be hooked up to your chest and/or limbs to measure your heart’s electrical activity. They will be sticky to ensure that they don’t slip during testing. The hair is shaved off the parts of the body where electrodes are attached. Make sure to lie very still during the procedure because speaking, fidgeting, and moving might distort the EKG results.

The test will only take a couple of minutes. The electrodes will start taking the impulses made by your heartbeat once you’re ready. A computer will then record these impulses and display them as waves on a printout or on a monitor. Your doctor will discuss your EKG results after the test or during your succeeding appointment.

Why You Might Need an EKG

An EKG can be used on individuals of all ages for diagnosing a myriad of common heart issues. In general, doctors may utilize an EKG for detecting the following:

  • Arrhythmias or heart rhythm abnormalities
  • A past heart attack
  • For checking how well, or not, particular heart disease treatments are working
  • Structural issues with the chambers of the heart
  • If narrowed or clogged heart arteries are causing a heart attack or chest pain

Your doctor may order other heart monitoring tests if he detects any irregularities in your EKG results. Likewise, you may have to undergo other heart rhythm tests if you’re experiencing these symptoms:

  • Chest pain
  • Rapid pulse
  • Heart Palpitations
  • Shortness of breath
  • Fatigue, weakness, or inability to exercise
  • Confusion, lightheadedness, or dizziness

Want to Learn More about EKGs and Other Heart Tests?

Consult with Dr. Jeffrey Chase or Dr. Ahmet Sayan here at the Virgin Island Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists. You can reach our St. Croix office at (340) 692-5000 and our St. Thomas office (340) 714-2845.

By Virgin Island Orthopaedics and Medical Specialists
February 24, 2020
Category: Cardiology
Tags: Pacemaker  

How a pacemaker from your doctors in Saint Thomas and St. Croix, Virgin Islands can save your life

A pacemaker is a small device placed under the skin to regulate your heartbeat, allowing it to save your life in the event of a heart attack. A pacemaker is typically recommended if you have an irregular heartbeat, known as an arrhythmia.

Here at Virgin Islands Orthopaedics & Medical Specialists, Dr. Jeffrey Chase and Dr. Ahmet Sayan can help if you need a pacemaker. With two convenient office locations in St. Thomas and St. Croix, read on to learn how their pacemakers can benefit you.

More about Pacemakers

There are three types of pacemakers:

  • A single chamber pacemaker, which routes electrical impulses to the right ventricle of your heart
  • A dual-chamber pacemaker, which routes electrical impulses to the right ventricle and right atrium of your heart; this type of pacemaker helps control the timing of contractions between the heart chambers.
  • A bi-ventricular pacemaker, which is recommended for people with heart failure and abnormal electrical systems; the bi-ventricular pacemaker stimulates the lower chambers of the heart to beat more regularly.

Your doctor may recommend a pacemaker to control your heartbeat. The pacemaker may be temporarily implanted because of a heart attack or surgery. The pacemaker may also be implanted permanently to regulate a slow or irregular heartbeat, or to treat heart failure.

Once installed, the pacemaker acts in place of your natural electrical system when your electrical system malfunctions. The pacemaker will work to speed up your heartbeat if your heart is beating too slowly, a condition known as bradycardia. Newer pacemakers can also detect increased body motion or increased breathing rate during exercise, so a signal is sent to speed up the heart rate.

Call Us

A pacemaker is an important cardiological advancement that can keep your heart beating in the proper rhythm. It can help you lead a normal, productive, active life if your heart is compromised. To learn more about pacemakers and how a pacemaker can help you, talk with the experts. Call Dr. Jeffrey Chase and Dr. Ahmet Sayan of Virgin Islands Orthopaedics & Medical Specialists, in St.Thomas at (340) 714-2845 or at their office in St. Croix at (340) 692-5000. Call now!





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